Daily Archives: October 21, 2009

Sisi (Small Oysters)



Sisi are small oysters and it is very rich in flavor compared to the bigger oysters. Although its hard to open these little shells, its worth the effort in every way. The salty full juice of Sisi will nourish you the whole day. You can find these Sisi or small oysters  in the Oyster stalls of Villa and Arevalo. Its great appetizer for Tanduay rhum or whiskey.

How to Boil Sisi (Small Oysters) in the Shell

Step 1
Purchase oysters with closed shells. If you find an oyster with an open shell, tap on the shell a couple times to see whether the shell closes. If the shell remains open, the oyster is dead and shouldn’t be consumed. Throw away dead oysters.

Step 2
Fill a small pot with water or broth until it is about two-thirds full. (It is important to use a smaller pot because a larger pot may prevent all the oysters from cooking properly.)

Step 3
Bring the liquid to a rolling boil, and drop the oysters into the pot. Boil for three to five minutes after the oyster shells open.

Step 4
Drain the oysters in a colander and rinse with cool water to prevent more cooking. Throw away any oysters that did not open during cooking.

Step 5
Serve the oysters plain or with (sinamak) vinegar or melted butter or hot sauce.

How to Boil Shucked Sisi (Small Oysters)

Step 1
Follow Step 1 above to discard dead oysters.

Step 2
Place a fresh oyster in a towel, and grab it with the palm of your hand. With your other hand, pry open the shell with an oyster knife. (See References for more information.)

Step 3
Insert the tip of the knife between the shell halves next to the oyster’s hinge. Wiggle and twist the knife until the oyster breaks open.

Step 4
Cut the oyster from the top shell, and place it in a bowl or on a plate. Then repeat with the bottom shell.

Step 5
Fill a small pot with water or broth until it is two-thirds full. Bring the liquid to a rolling boil, and drop the oysters into the pot. Boil for at least three minutes. The ends of the oysters will curl once the oysters are fully cooked.

Step 6
Remove the pot from heat once the oyster edges have curled. Drain the oysters in a colander, and rinse with cool water to prevent further cooking.

Step 7
Serve the boiled oysters plain or with (sinamak) vinegar or melted butter or hot sauce.

Alternative Steamed Sisi ingredients

* 12 Oysters In Shells
* 1 T Low-Calorie Margarine
* 1?2 t lemon juice, fresh
* Ds Tabasco Sauce

Cooking Steamed oysters

1. Scrub and rinse the oysters under cold running water.
2. Place the oysters around the edge of a large microwave plate (two may go in the middle if necessary).
3. With the microwave on high, cook for 5 to 7 minutes or until the shells open; turn the plate every 3 minutes for even cooking.
4. Remove the oysters from their shells with a shucking knife.
5. Place them on heated dish and keep them warm.
6. Meanwhile, combine the margarine, lemon juice and tabasco sauce in a small microwave dish.
7. Cook on high 20 to 25 seconds or until the margarine is melted.
8. Serve with the oysters.
9. One serving: calories: 45 carbohydrates: negligible exchange: ½ medium-fat meat.

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Kasag (Steamed Blue Crabs)



STEAMED CRABS

water
2 1/2 tablespoons OLDBAY seasoning
cider vinegar
3 tablespoons salt

Pot should have raised rack, minimum 2″ high.
Add equal quantities water and vinegar to just below level of rack.
Layer crabs; sprinkle each layer with mixture of OLD BAY SEASONING and salt.
Cover and steam until crabs are red.

BOILED CRABS

3 quarts water
1 OLDBAY Crab Boil
spice bag 1/4 cup
cider vinegar
2 tablespoons salt

Fill a large pot with 3 quarts water, vinegar, spice bag, and 2 tablespoons salt.
Bring to a boil.
Add blue claw crabs.
Bring back to a boil, cover 20 minutes or until crabs turn red.
Remove and drain.
To enhance flavor omit vinegar and add large pieces of celery,
onion, and lemon to boiling water before adding crabs.
If spice bags are not available substitute 3 tablespoons OLDBAY seasoning
and 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper.

SOFT SHELLED CRABS

egg lightly beaten
crushed cracker crumbs

Live soft-shelled crabs are killed at cleaning.
It may seem unpleasant, but the quickest way to do this is by
sticking the point of a knife or an ice pick between the eyes.
If you bought your soft-shell crabs frozen, let them thaw a bit before cleaning.
Lay the soft-shelled crab on its back and remove the apron.
Turn the crab over, lift up the pointed ends (spikes) and
remove the six gills on each side.
Then replace each point to its original position.
With scissors, cut off the mouth, eyes and feelers.
Wash the crab thoroughly, even under the spikes.

Dip the crab in egg and cracker meal and fry, deep-fry or broil for ten minutes
, aprox five minutes on each side and season to taste with salt, pepper,
and a shake of OLDBAY seasoning.

NEW JERSEY CRAB BOIL

3 lemons, quartered
12 new red potatoes
6 small ears fresh corn
6 small yellow onions
6 medium carrots
1/4 Cup OLDBAY seasoning
1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
1 tablespoon ground white pepper
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
12 live blue crabs
1/2 cup salt
1 cup white wine

Fill a large 10-quart stockpot one-third full with water.
Add wine, OLDBAY seasoning, salt, peppers and the lemons, bring to boil.
Then add potatoes, corn, onions, and carrots, cover and let boil for 10 minutes.
Add the crabs, cover, and return to boil.
Once steam starts to escape from under the cover, lower to medium let cook for 15 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit, covered, for 10 minutes more.

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Talaba (Boiled Oysters)



Talaba  or Oysters have a soft flesh that can taste sweet, salty or even melon-like, depending on where they are harvested. These expensive treats can be eaten in various ways: raw, boiled, steamed, baked, fried, stewed, pickled, or roasted. Because raw oysters may contain dangerous bacteria, many people opt to boil their oysters to enjoy this seafood delicacy.

How to Boil Oysters in the Shell

Step 1
Purchase oysters with closed shells. If you find an oyster with an open shell, tap on the shell a couple times to see whether the shell closes. If the shell remains open, the oyster is dead and shouldn’t be consumed. Throw away dead oysters.

Step 2
Fill a small pot with water or broth until it is about two-thirds full. (It is important to use a smaller pot because a larger pot may prevent all the oysters from cooking properly.)

Step 3
Bring the liquid to a rolling boil, and drop the oysters into the pot. Boil for three to five minutes after the oyster shells open.

Step 4
Drain the oysters in a colander and rinse with cool water to prevent more cooking. Throw away any oysters that did not open during cooking.

Step 5
Serve the oysters plain or with (sinamak) vinegar or melted butter or hot sauce.

How to Boil Shucked Oysters

Step 1
Follow Step 1 above to discard dead oysters.

Step 2
Place a fresh oyster in a towel, and grab it with the palm of your hand. With your other hand, pry open the shell with an oyster knife. (See References for more information.)

Step 3
Insert the tip of the knife between the shell halves next to the oyster’s hinge. Wiggle and twist the knife until the oyster breaks open.

Step 4
Cut the oyster from the top shell, and place it in a bowl or on a plate. Then repeat with the bottom shell.

Step 5
Fill a small pot with water or broth until it is two-thirds full. Bring the liquid to a rolling boil, and drop the oysters into the pot. Boil for at least three minutes. The ends of the oysters will curl once the oysters are fully cooked.

Step 6
Remove the pot from heat once the oyster edges have curled. Drain the oysters in a colander, and rinse with cool water to prevent further cooking.

Step 7
Serve the boiled oysters plain or with (sinamak) vinegar or melted butter or hot sauce.

With your humble donation you can support our website to provide FREE recipes and our educational outreach activities to the community.


Thank you very much.