Category Archives: Noodles and Soups

LaPaz Batchoy (Pork Egg Noodle Soup)


batchoy

Philippines has a variety of soups, among which is the La Paz Batchoy that originated in Iloilo. It is a noodle soup garnished with Pork innards, crushed Pork cracklings, vegetables, and topped with cracked raw egg; a truly tempting treat.
Estimated preparation and cooking time: 1 hour and 30 minutes

La Paz batchoy has always been my favorite egg noodle soup. Iloilo is the place for many popular soups in the Philippines, food is one of the City’s attractions. To name a few they have chicken inasal, piaya, biscocho, pancit molo and of course La Paz batchoy. La Paz batchoy is a must dish when ever I am in Iloilo, the authentic La Paz batchoy of Iloilo has that distinct salty, sweet and spicy flavor that is only uniquely Ilonggo.

Philippines has a variety of soups, among which is the La Paz Batchoy that originated in Iloilo. It is a noodle soup garnished with Pork innards, crushed Pork cracklings, vegetables, and topped with cracked raw egg; a truly tempting treat.

Estimated preparation and cooking time: 1 hour and 30 minutes

La Paz Batchoy Ingredients:

1 kilo mami noodles

Broth

1 medium size onion, quartered

1/2 head garlic, crushed

1/2 tsp. shrimp paste (bagoong)

1 tbsp. peppercorns, crushed

2 tbsp. worcestershire sauce

10-12 c. beef/pork stock

1 tbsp. sugar

1 tsp. soy sauce

salt to taste

Toppings

250 g. pork

150 g. pork liver

150 g. beef tripe  (optional and be boiled on a separate pot. It should be cleaned properly by washing with water)

150 g. pork intestine (its optional and be boiled on a separate pot. It should be cleaned properly by washing with water inside the intestine)

150 g. shrimps or 2 spoonful of shrimp paste (preferably Visayan Guinamos)

Garnishing

chicharon, crushed

chopped garlic,fried

chopped spring onion

La Paz Batchoy Cooking Instructions:

In a large pot, pour in 10-12 c. of stock (from boiled beef and pork bones) and add all broth ingredients and bring to a boil.

Add in pork and liver in the pot, let simmer for 20–25 minutes or until pork and liver are tender add more stock if necessary.

Remove pork and liver from the pot, drain and let cool.

**Reduce heat and place the 1 spoonful of shrimp paste (preferably Visayan Guinamos) on a cloth formed like a pouch and blanch in the boiling soup to mix the flavor.  Avoid mixing the shrimp paste to the soup that is why we need to put into a cloth pouch.

**Remove shrimp paste pouch from the pot once you have batchoy flavor set.

If no shrimp paste is available you can use shrimp and follow 2 steps below and continue.

 

  • Reduce heat and blanch shrimp until cooked.
  • Remove shrimp from the pot, remove shell and head each shrimp, set aside.

Continue simmering the broth in low heat until ready to serve, season with salt to taste.

** Boil beef tripe and Pork intestine on a separate pot (do not with your broth) and then slice into thin strips and set aside. (optional to add beef tripe)

Slice the pork,  and liver into thin strips and set aside.

Place noodles in serving bowl and pour strained boiling stock over the noodles. Top with pork, chicken, liver, shrimp. Garnish with chicharon, spring onion and fried garlic.

Serve immediately.

IMG_3970

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Ginataang Munggo (Mung Bean Soup)


Method #1
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons munggo, toasted in a skillet
1 cup coco cream
1 cup malagkit (glutinous rice)
5 cups coconut milk
1 cup sugar
Procedure:
Parch the munggo; rub off husks and winnow.
Combine malagkit and munggo; wash well and cook in coconut milk until done.
Remove from fire; stir in coco cream and sugar.
Serve hot or cold for 10.
Method #2
Ingredients:
1/4 cup munggo
5 cups (approx.) water
1 cup fresh, canned or frozen corn kernels
1 can or 1 pkg. coconut milk
1/2 to 3/4 cups white sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)
Preparation:
Toast the munggo in a wok or heavy skillet until brown
Cool and roll in rolling pin to cut them in halves
Add the toasted munggo with the rice so they will cook together
They’re kind of tough so you will need to cook the lugaw a bit longer
Add the rest of the ingredients and you have ginataang munggo or what Kapampangans call Lelut Balatung and Lelut Mais for the other

munggo

Gintaang Munggo was one of my favorite dishes as I was growing up in the Philippines. I’ve been searching for a recipe for this online and I managed to find a good one!

Method #1

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons munggo, toasted in a skillet

1 cup coco cream

1 cup malagkit (glutinous rice)

5 cups coconut milk

1 cup sugar

Procedure:

Parch the munggo; rub off husks and winnow.

Combine malagkit and munggo; wash well and cook in coconut milk until done.

Remove from fire; stir in coco cream and sugar.

Serve hot or cold for 10.

Method #2

Ingredients:

1/4 cup munggo

5 cups (approx.) water

1 cup fresh, canned or frozen corn kernels

1 can or 1 pkg. coconut milk

1/2 to 3/4 cups white sugar

1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)

Preparation:

Toast the munggo in a wok or heavy skillet until brown

Cool and roll in rolling pin to cut them in halves

Add the toasted munggo with the rice so they will cook together

They’re kind of tough so you will need to cook the lugaw a bit longer

Add the rest of the ingredients and you have ginataang munggo

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Tambo (Bamboo Shoot Soup)



Tambo is the Ilonggo term for bamboo shoots while labong is the tagalog term. Sometimes the term tambo refers to the dish itself because tambo is the signature ingredient of this classic Ilonggo sud-an or viand. However, for a more detailed description, the dish is oftentimes called utan nga tambo in order to emphasize that what is wanted is tambo with vegetables rather than referring to other dishes such asAtchara nga Tambo or Tambo with Bagongon-telescope shells.

These fresh bamboo shoots come from the farms and mountains of Iloilo. Right after summer, at the end of May, new bamboo shoots sprout from the main bamboo plant especially when the rainy season starts to unfold. This is what rural folks refer to as“tigtarambo or season for bamboo shoots. Thus, tambo can be bought cheapest during this season. Therefore, you could find it in public markets in Iloilo, for only ten pesos per kilo.

However, whenever tambo is already out of season-starting from the months of August and September-its price from ten pesos per kilo doubles.
Utan nga tambo can be cooked in different ways and with varying ingredients. I discovered through my interviews that the choice on whether what ingredients to be used depends on one’s preferences and social status. For instance, the simplest tambo recipe only has the following ingredients: tambo, coconut milk, okra or tugabang (saluyot leaves) and bagoong. Moreover, the regular tambo recipe includes shrimps and does not include bagoong. Finally, the ultimate tambo recipe would consist of tambo, coconut milk, crabs or  even alimango, okra and tugabang (saluyot leaves) or takway.

Serving is good for 4-6 people.

Here are the ingredients

2 cans of Tambo – labong in tagalog; Young bamboo shoots. It is abundant during rainy days. You can use the canned bamboo shoots if you cannot find fresh. 

1 stalk of Tugabang – saluyot in filipino (and in other asian countries); Its english name is jute mallow or jute leaves

1 lbs Okra 

2 Yellow Corn. We Ilonggos would like to use the glutinous variety of corn.

1 can of Coconut milk – set aside the kakang gata.

1 lbs Fresh Shrimps or Crabs or Dried Fish or Visayan Shrimp Paste (Guinamos)

Procedure:

1) Boil your sliced bamboo shoots until its soft to chew. Discard the water. Squeeze out excess water.
Boil this again in 4-5 cups of water.

2.) Add your okra until soup is slimy

3. ) Add your second batch of coconut milk. At this stage I like to add some cloves of garlic. You can add your grated corn here if it’s fresh.

4.) You can now add your shrimps, or blue crabs or dried fish.

*Our Ilonggo secret ingredient: Add one spoon of Visayan Shrimp Paste to flavor (optional if available)

5) Add your tugabang(Jute Leaves)

6) Add your remaining kakang gata(coconut milk), simmer for another minute and serve.

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Sinabawan na Isda (Fish Soup)


This is like a Nilaga but with a different twist. This recipe is so easy to make.
Ingredients and cooking procedure after the jump.
Ingredients:
* 1 kilo of Pork Ribs
* 2 big tomatoes
* 2 Pechay (Bungkos)
* 1 big white onion
* 3 Green Chilli
* Salt & Fish sauce to taste
Cooking procedure:
1. Put 1 liter of water in a caserole, pour pork ribs when water is boiling.
2. When pork is almost tender, add sliced tomatoes and boil it until tomatoes almost mushy.
3. Add the Pechay and the green chilli (optional) but don’t over cook it.
4. Add salt and fish sauce to taste.

This is like a Sinigang but with a different twist. This recipe is so easy to make.

Ingredients and cooking procedure after the jump.

Ingredients:

* 2 lbs  Fish (Tuna, Red Snapper, Rock Cod… any fish good for soup)

* 1 lbs Fish Head (Tuna, Red Snapper, Rock Cod… any fish good for soup)

* 2 big sliced tomatoes

* 2 string beans (Balatong)

* 1 stalk of kangkong

* 1 big red onion

* 3 Green Chilli

* Salt & Fish sauce to taste

Cooking procedure:

1. Put 1 liter of water in a caserole, pour tomatoes and red onions when water is boiling until it is mushy.

2. Pour all the fish in caserole, when fish is almost cook.

3. Add the green beans, kangkong and the green chilli (optional) but don’t over cook it.

4. Add salt and fish sauce to taste.

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Kadios, Baboy, Lanka – KBL (Beans, pork, jackfruit)



The “Kadios” are black beans. If you’re not from Iloilo or the Visayas, you may not recognize this.  The “Langka” is jackfruit, raw and green, for the purpose of this recipe. Since there is no raw and green fresh jackfruit in my part of the world, I used the canned ones imported from Thailand (available at all oriental stores).
Which brings me to an important point – this recipe is intended for those in the U.S. or other parts of the world who don’t have access to a cook or ingredients.
Ingredients: (good for a family of 3 to 4, good for lunch, dinner and lunch the next day)
about 3/4 cup of Kadios. (Look for it in the frozen section. If you are in L.A., Florida, or Las Vegas, I heard they have fresh ones.)
beef shanks meat – about 2 to 3 pounds (sliced into desired sizes)
a can of young green, jackfruit (use fresh if you have, again, lucky you)
soy sauce, vinegar, salt to taste
3 cloves of garlic (crushed)
1 ginger (about a thumb-size, crushed as well)
1 medium-sized tomato (sliced into pieces)
1 medium-sized onion (sliced as well)
vegetable oil
(optional) lemon grass (tanglad)
(very optional) pechay (baby bokchoy)
– Soak the kadios in cold water overnight. This will rehydrate the beans. (they were dehydrated to preserve them to start with). Get rid of the floating ones.
– In a pressure cooker, together with the re-hydrated beans, add about 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. After 15 to 20 minutes of that dreaded pressure-cooker “hissing” sound, turn the fire off.
– In a separate pot or pan, put the garlic and ginger in about 3 tablespoons of hot oil. When they turn light brown, add the tomatoes and onions. Sweat the onions out a little, then add the meat (include the bones), about 3 tbsp (maybe more) of soy sauce, 3 tbsp (maybe more) of vinegar and salt to taste. You can adjust to your own taste later. Mix and cover for a good 5 minutes. The smell is very tempting at this point.
– Open that pressure-cooker with the kadios in it and add the just-sauteed meat. Add more water if necessary (kun gusto mo damu’ sabaw), put cover, turn the fire on and let it “hiss” for another 15 to 20 minutes. (If you’re using pork, remember that pork needs a shorter time to tenderize, you may want to shorten the time, or skip this step altogether.)
– After 15 to 20 minutes, turn off fire, and let hissing sound subside. You may transfer the pressure-cooker contents (the meat and beans now tenderized) if you wish to a regular pot. Bring to a boil again and add the “langka” (for about 5 minutes). Add the tanglad for its incredible aroma. Add more salt to taste.
– Add several pieces of pechay leaves if you want. To make it healthier (you wish). But you don’t have to.
– Get the rice, the soda and sleep afterwards…
With your humble donation you can support our website to provide FREE recipes and our educational outreach activities to the community.

The “Kadios” are black beans. If you’re not from Iloilo or the Visayas, you may not recognize this.  The “Langka” is jackfruit, raw and green, for the purpose of this recipe. Since there is no raw and green fresh jackfruit in my part of the world, I used the canned ones imported from Thailand (available at all oriental stores).

Which brings me to an important point – this recipe is intended for those in the U.S. or other parts of the world who don’t have access to a cook or ingredients.

Ingredients: (good for a family of 3 to 4, good for lunch, dinner and lunch the next day)

about 3/4 cup of Kadios. (Look for it in the frozen section. If you are in L.A., Florida, or Las Vegas, I heard they have fresh ones.)

beef shanks meat – about 2 to 3 pounds (sliced into desired sizes)

a can of young green, jackfruit (use fresh if you have, again, lucky you)

soy sauce, vinegar, salt to taste

3 cloves of garlic (crushed)

1 ginger (about a thumb-size, crushed as well)

1 medium-sized tomato (sliced into pieces)

1 medium-sized onion (sliced as well)

vegetable oil

(optional) lemon grass (tanglad)

(very optional) pechay (baby bokchoy)

– Soak the kadios in cold water overnight. This will rehydrate the beans. (they were dehydrated to preserve them to start with). Get rid of the floating ones.

– In a pressure cooker, together with the re-hydrated beans, add about 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. After 15 to 20 minutes of that dreaded pressure-cooker “hissing” sound, turn the fire off.

– In a separate pot or pan, put the garlic and ginger in about 3 tablespoons of hot oil. When they turn light brown, add the tomatoes and onions. Sweat the onions out a little, then add the meat (include the bones), about 3 tbsp (maybe more) of soy sauce, 3 tbsp (maybe more) of vinegar and salt to taste. You can adjust to your own taste later. Mix and cover for a good 5 minutes. The smell is very tempting at this point.

– Open that pressure-cooker with the kadios in it and add the just-sauteed meat. Add more water if necessary (kun gusto mo damu’ sabaw), put cover, turn the fire on and let it “hiss” for another 15 to 20 minutes. (If you’re using pork, remember that pork needs a shorter time to tenderize, you may want to shorten the time, or skip this step altogether.)

– After 15 to 20 minutes, turn off fire, and let hissing sound subside. You may transfer the pressure-cooker contents (the meat and beans now tenderized) if you wish to a regular pot. Bring to a boil again and add the “langka” (for about 5 minutes). Add the tanglad for its incredible aroma. Add more salt to taste.

– Add several pieces of pechay leaves if you want. To make it healthier (you wish). But you don’t have to.

– Get the rice, the soda and sleep afterwards…

With your humble donation you can support our website to provide FREE recipes and our educational outreach activities to the community.


Thank you very much.