Tag Archives: appetizer

Ilonggo Guinamos (Ilonggo Shrimp Cake)

Materials and Equipment

  • Small shrimps (alamang) Salt Mortar and pestle
  • Polyethylene bags Drying trays Banana leaves
  • Plastic bowls

Procedure

  1. Remove adhering materials from shrimp. Wash thoroughly by placing them in a woven basket and dipping in clean seawater several times.
  2. Partially dry the shrimps for one day to lower the moisture content, by spreading them thinly on clean mats or drying racks.
  3. Add salt to shrimp (2:3) during tracing. Tracing is done by pounding the shrimp-salt mass with mortar and pestle. After mixing, dry the mass for one day.
  4. Form into round shape or cubes
  5. Package product in clean banana leaves or in low-density polyethylene bags.

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Adobong Kambing (Goat Meat Adobo)

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Adobong Kambing Recipe (Goat Adobo) is another way of cooking goat’s meat, if you are bored with Kalderetang Kambing which require a lot of spices and ingredients.

Estimated cooking time: 1 hour and 20 minutes
Adobong Kambing Ingredients:
1 kilo kambing spareribs (Goat’s Spare ribs), cut into serving pieces, bones intact
cooking oil
2 thumb size ginger, sliced
1/2 head garlic, crushed
1 large onion, sliced
1 tsp. peppercorns
2 stalk lemon grass
3 bay leaf
1/2 c. soy sauce
3-5 pcs. green hot chilli
3/4 c. vinegar
salt and pepper
Adobong Kambing Cooking Instructions:
Marinate kambing in 1/2 c. vinegar ( this will remove the pungent odor of the meat )
1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper for 15 to 30 minutes before cooking.
Drain and discard marinade.
In a frying pan fry kambing in batches until color changes to golden brown and start to sizzle.
In a saucepan put in fried kambing, pour in 2-3 c. of water, 1/4 c. vinegar and soy sauce.
Add lemon grass, ginger, onion, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaf and chilli.
Bring to a boil and simmer in medium heat for 15-30 minutes or until tender and liquid is reduced to almost dry.
Serve hot with a lots of rice.

Estimated cooking time: 1 hour and 20 minutes

Adobong Kambing Ingredients:

1 kilo kambing spareribs (Goat’s Spare ribs), cut into serving pieces, bones intact

cooking oil

2 thumb size ginger, sliced

1/2 head garlic, crushed

1 large onion, sliced

1 tsp. peppercorns

2 stalk lemon grass

3 bay leaf

1/2 c. soy sauce

3-5 pcs. green hot chilli

3/4 c. vinegar

salt and pepper

Adobong Kambing Cooking Instructions:

Marinate kambing in 1/2 c. vinegar ( this will remove the pungent odor of the meat )

1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper for 15 to 30 minutes before cooking.

Drain and discard marinade.

In a frying pan fry kambing in batches until color changes to golden brown and start to sizzle.

In a saucepan put in fried kambing, pour in 2-3 c. of water, 1/4 c. vinegar and soy sauce.

Add lemon grass, ginger, onion, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaf and chilli.

Bring to a boil and simmer in medium heat for 15-30 minutes or until tender and liquid is reduced to almost dry.

Serve hot with a lots of rice.

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Balut (Broiled Duck Egg)

balut2

One of the many well known Filipino food delicacy that can be found here only in the Philippines is called “balut”.

A balut is a fertilized duck (or chicken) egg with a nearly-developed embryo inside that is boiled and eaten in the shell. It is commonly sold as streetfood in the Philippines.

Balut is usually served warm and fresh. Some of the pubs in Philippines serves the balut with beers.

The Pinoys usually tap the tip of the Balut to make a small crack on the top and drink up the juices inside the egg shell. After that the Balut shell will be cracked open and a pinch of salt will be springled on the Balut. Then, get ready to ‘wallup’ the whole thing into your mouth. I’m sure it’d taste good with beer.

Filipino Food Delicacy BalutBalut are most often eaten with a pinch of salt, some prefer chili and vinegar to complement their egg. The eggs are savored for their balance of textures and flavors; the broth surrounding the embryo is sipped from the egg before the shell is peeled and the yolk and young chick inside can be eaten. All of the contents of the egg are consumed, although the whites may remain uneaten, due to its toughness depending on the age of the fertilized egg.

Balut is now being served as appetizers in restaurants; cooked adobo style, fried in omelettes or even used as filling in baked pastries.

Ingredients:

> Fresh duck’s egg

> Salt, vinegar or fish sauce

How to cook?

1. Place the fresh duck egg on a boiling water for 5-8 mins till hard boiled. Do not over cook the eggs.

2. Serve with salt, vinegar or fish sauce.

How to eat a Balut?

1. Place the egg in an egg holder so that it is resting vertically. The “long end” of the egg should be standing up.
2.Crack the egg around the top by gently tapping your spoon against the shell. Remove the top of the shell once you have traveled all the way around the egg. Make sure to discard any bits of shell which fell into the Balut.
3.Add a dash of red wine vinegar, a dash of chili sauce and a tiny pinch of sea salt. (Don’t go overboard on the salt because the chili sauce will have sodium in it as well.) The combination of the chili sauce and the vinegar will provide a spicy sweet flavor.
4.Drink the broth from the surrounding duck embryo. It is customary to drink the broth before ingesting the embryo.
5.Throw back the rest of the Balut as if you were taking a shot. Once the duck embryo has been boiled, the bones become soft. So there’s not need to worry about crunching on anything.
6.Drink any residual broth that was in the shell and then discard.

1. Place the egg in an egg holder so that it is resting vertically. The “long end” of the egg should be standing up.

2.Crack the egg around the top by gently tapping your spoon against the shell. Remove the top of the shell once you have traveled all the way around the egg. Make sure to discard any bits of shell which fell into the Balut.

3.Add a dash of red wine vinegar, a dash of chili sauce and a tiny pinch of sea salt. (Don’t go overboard on the salt because the chili sauce will have sodium in it as well.) The combination of the chili sauce and the vinegar will provide a spicy sweet flavor.

4.Drink the broth from the surrounding duck embryo. It is customary to drink the broth before ingesting the embryo.

5.Throw back the rest of the Balut as if you were taking a shot. Once the duck embryo has been boiled, the bones become soft. So there’s not need to worry about crunching on anything.

6.Drink any residual broth that was in the shell and then discard.

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Bopis (Diced Pork Lungs and Heart)

bopis

Bopis is originally a spicy Spanish dish adapted by Filipinos. Its main ingredients include pork lungs and heart  sauteed in herbs and spices. Cooking time is around fifteen minutes so it can be categorized as a thirty minute dish, including prep time. Here’s how:

Ingredients:

1/2 kilo ground/minced/cubed pork lungs and heart

1 whole garlic head, crushed and minced

1 whole onion head, minced

1 red bell pepper, minced

pepper

chili slices (adjust according to taste)

atsuete /annato seed oil

2 tablespoons cooking oil

salt

*you can substitute salt for patis/fish sauce

Procedure:

Heat oil in a pan and saute garlic until you can smell its aroma then mix in the onions. After two minutes, mix the pork heart and lungs. Cook for about five minutes or just until the meat turns brown. Season with salt, pepper and the chili slices. Pour in the annato seed oil and bell pepper. Stir and let cook for around ten more minutes, adjusting the taste as you go along. Serve with plain steamed rice. :)

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Kahang na Pasayan (Szechuan Shrimp)

A delicious spicy stir-fry. If you like it hotter, stir in some sambal oelek (chile paste) to your dish at the end. Goes great with rice or noodles.

SERVES 4 (change servings and units)

Ingredients

* 1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
* 1 tablespoon ketchup
* 1 tablespoon Heinz chili sauce
* 1 tablespoon rice wine or sherry wine
* 1 tablespoon soy sauce
* 1 teaspoon sugar
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
* 1 tablespoon cornstarch
* 2 teaspoons canola oil (peanut oil if you prefer)
* 4 green onions, chopped
* 2 tablespoons minced gingerroot
* 2 teaspoons minced garlic

Directions

1. Mix ketchup, chili sauce rice wine, soy sauce, sugar, salt, pepper flakes, and corn starch in small bowl to make sauce.
2. Pour oil in seasoned wok before heating and wipe around.
3. Heat wok and add scallions ginger and garlic.
4. Stir-fry for a few seconds, then add shrimp.
5. Stir constantly for about 2 minutes, adding small amounts of water if food starts to stick; cook until shrimp turns pink.
6. Stir sauce again, then add to wok, stirring constantly until mixture thickens.
7. Serve with steamed rice.

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Beef Salpicao (Stir-fried Garlic Beef)

BEFFSALPICAO

This is a Filipino recipe and whenever I bring this for lunch at work, my officemates can’t help but “sample” it. The beef is tender and juicy with a buttery-garlic flavor.

SERVES 4 (change servings and units)
Change to: Servings US Metric Close

Ingredients

* 1 lb beef tenderloin, cut into 1/2 inch chunks (or other tender cut)
* 2 tablespoons olive oil or canola oil
* 6 cloves garlic, minced (more if you like)
* salt, to taste
* fresh ground black pepper, to taste
* 1/4 teaspoon paprika
* 3 tablespoons oyster sauce
* 1/4 cup liquid seasoning
* 3 tablespoons butter or margarine

Directions

1. Combine oil, garlic, salt, pepper, and paprika in a bowl.
2. Marinate beef chunks in garlic-oil mixture for a couple of hours or more in the fridge.
3. Saute marinated beef (including marinade) in VERY hot oil.
4. Keep stirring until beef chunks are browned evenly.
5. DO NOT lower heat.
6. Add oyster sauce and liquid seasoning.
7. Cook a few seconds more; add butter last.
8. Remove from heat and serve immediately over hot steamed rice.
9. *Note:Cooking time should be about 10 minutes or less to keep beef tender.

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Sizzling Sisig (Sizzling Spicy Pork)



Description:

Sisig is a Kapampangan term which means “to snack on something sour”. It usually refers to fruits, often unripe or half-ripe, sometimes dipped in salt and vinegar. It also refers to a method of preparing fish and meat, especially pork, which is marinated in a sour liquid such as lemon juice or vinegar, then seasoned with salt, pepper and other spices.

Sisig also refers to Sizzling sisig, a Filipino dish made from parts of pig’s head and liver, usually seasoned with calamansi and chili peppers.

Sisig queen

Lucia Cunanan of Angeles City has been credited with inventing sisig. The Philippine Department of Tourism has acknowledged that her “Aling Lucing’s” restaurant had established Angeles City as the “Sisig Capital of the Philippines” in 1974. Cunanan’s trademark sisig was developed in mid 1974 when she served a concoction of boiled and chopped pig ears and cheeks seasoned with vinegar, calamansi juice, chopped onions and chicken liver and served in hot plates. Today, varieties include sisig ala pizzailo, pork combination, green mussels or tahong, mixed seafood, ostrich sisig, spicy python, frog sisig and tokwa’t baboy, among others.

Ingredients:
Approx. 1/2 pig’s head, quartered
8 cups water
2 cups pineapple juice
1 tbsp whole black peppercorn
4 pcs chicken liver
1 tbsp iodized salt

Seasoning:
1 cup white onion, chopped
1/4 cup sukang puti
1/4 cup calamansi juice
salt and pepper to taste
siling labuyo, optional

Directions:
In a stockpot, place water, pineapple juice, salt, peppercorn, chicken liver and pig’s head. Cover stockpot and bring to a boil until meat becomes tender, approximately 30 minutes. Remove meat from stockpot and allow to cool to room temperature. Debone and put in bamboo skewers together with chicken liver. Grill over charcoal until skin becomes brown and crisp. Cut the pork and liver into small cubes. Mix the seasoning and serve on a hot skillet.

Pahabol: in the absence of pig’s head, substitute with 1 kilo bagnet or lechon kawali. It will be a knockout just the same.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisig

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