Tag Archives: filipino recipe

Ginataang Munggo (Mung Bean Soup)


Method #1
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons munggo, toasted in a skillet
1 cup coco cream
1 cup malagkit (glutinous rice)
5 cups coconut milk
1 cup sugar
Procedure:
Parch the munggo; rub off husks and winnow.
Combine malagkit and munggo; wash well and cook in coconut milk until done.
Remove from fire; stir in coco cream and sugar.
Serve hot or cold for 10.
Method #2
Ingredients:
1/4 cup munggo
5 cups (approx.) water
1 cup fresh, canned or frozen corn kernels
1 can or 1 pkg. coconut milk
1/2 to 3/4 cups white sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)
Preparation:
Toast the munggo in a wok or heavy skillet until brown
Cool and roll in rolling pin to cut them in halves
Add the toasted munggo with the rice so they will cook together
They’re kind of tough so you will need to cook the lugaw a bit longer
Add the rest of the ingredients and you have ginataang munggo or what Kapampangans call Lelut Balatung and Lelut Mais for the other

munggo

Gintaang Munggo was one of my favorite dishes as I was growing up in the Philippines. I’ve been searching for a recipe for this online and I managed to find a good one!

Method #1

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons munggo, toasted in a skillet

1 cup coco cream

1 cup malagkit (glutinous rice)

5 cups coconut milk

1 cup sugar

Procedure:

Parch the munggo; rub off husks and winnow.

Combine malagkit and munggo; wash well and cook in coconut milk until done.

Remove from fire; stir in coco cream and sugar.

Serve hot or cold for 10.

Method #2

Ingredients:

1/4 cup munggo

5 cups (approx.) water

1 cup fresh, canned or frozen corn kernels

1 can or 1 pkg. coconut milk

1/2 to 3/4 cups white sugar

1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)

Preparation:

Toast the munggo in a wok or heavy skillet until brown

Cool and roll in rolling pin to cut them in halves

Add the toasted munggo with the rice so they will cook together

They’re kind of tough so you will need to cook the lugaw a bit longer

Add the rest of the ingredients and you have ginataang munggo

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Sinabawan na Isda (Fish Soup)


This is like a Nilaga but with a different twist. This recipe is so easy to make.
Ingredients and cooking procedure after the jump.
Ingredients:
* 1 kilo of Pork Ribs
* 2 big tomatoes
* 2 Pechay (Bungkos)
* 1 big white onion
* 3 Green Chilli
* Salt & Fish sauce to taste
Cooking procedure:
1. Put 1 liter of water in a caserole, pour pork ribs when water is boiling.
2. When pork is almost tender, add sliced tomatoes and boil it until tomatoes almost mushy.
3. Add the Pechay and the green chilli (optional) but don’t over cook it.
4. Add salt and fish sauce to taste.

This is like a Sinigang but with a different twist. This recipe is so easy to make.

Ingredients and cooking procedure after the jump.

Ingredients:

* 2 lbs  Fish (Tuna, Red Snapper, Rock Cod… any fish good for soup)

* 1 lbs Fish Head (Tuna, Red Snapper, Rock Cod… any fish good for soup)

* 2 big sliced tomatoes

* 2 string beans (Balatong)

* 1 stalk of kangkong

* 1 big red onion

* 3 Green Chilli

* Salt & Fish sauce to taste

Cooking procedure:

1. Put 1 liter of water in a caserole, pour tomatoes and red onions when water is boiling until it is mushy.

2. Pour all the fish in caserole, when fish is almost cook.

3. Add the green beans, kangkong and the green chilli (optional) but don’t over cook it.

4. Add salt and fish sauce to taste.

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Dinuguan with Puto (Pork dark soup with rice cake)

One Friday evening my friends and I decided to have dinner at Jologs at the Lucky Plaza. I find it to be a clean, cozy restaurant that serves food for value. I’ve tried their -silogs and I always recommend it to my Filipino friends who are looking for Filipino foods. That evening though, I was in the mood to try something other than silog on their menu. And since I was not keen on eating rice either, I settled on puto and dinuguan. I was not the least disappointed. :o )

Dinuguan is traditionally made up of pork intestines cooked with pig blood (yah, to other cultures this sounds a bit ewwyy). As long as the cook knows how to clean the intestines, and the secret to remove the odor, dinuguan can be a truly delicious experience. The dinuguan I had at Jologs was not made up of intestines though, I think the meat came from the ear or face portion of the pork since it was a bit crunchy.

Puto is steamed rice cake and has a spongy and lightly fluffy texture. Some recipes put cheese on top, which is equally delicious as the plain version. For puto paired with dinuguan, I like it plain and not so sticky. This was just what I had that night.

Ingredients:

1/2 kilo pork (diced)

1/8 kilo pork liver (diced)

1 small head of garlic (minced)

1 small onion (minced)

2 pieces laurel leaves

3 tablespoons oil

1/2 cup vinegar

3 tablespoons patis (fish sauce)

2-cups stock

1-cup pig blood (frozen)

4 long green peppers

2 teaspoons sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper
Instructions
1. In a pot, simmer pork for 30 minutes and remove scum
that rises to the surface. Keep stock.

2. In a casserole, heat oil and saute garlic and onion
for a minute.

3. Add in pork, pork liver, laurel leaves, patis, salt
& pepper and saute for another 5 minutes.

4. Add in vinegar and bring up to a boil without
stirring.

5. Lower heat and allow simmering uncovered until most of
the liquid has evaporated.

6. Add in stock and allow simmering for 5 minutes.

7. Add in blood, sugar and long green peppers.

8. Cook for 10 minutes more or until consistency
thickens, stirring occasionally to avoid
curdling.

9. Serve hot with puto.

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Sizzling Sisig (Sizzling Spicy Pork)



Description:

Sisig is a Kapampangan term which means “to snack on something sour”. It usually refers to fruits, often unripe or half-ripe, sometimes dipped in salt and vinegar. It also refers to a method of preparing fish and meat, especially pork, which is marinated in a sour liquid such as lemon juice or vinegar, then seasoned with salt, pepper and other spices.

Sisig also refers to Sizzling sisig, a Filipino dish made from parts of pig’s head and liver, usually seasoned with calamansi and chili peppers.

Sisig queen

Lucia Cunanan of Angeles City has been credited with inventing sisig. The Philippine Department of Tourism has acknowledged that her “Aling Lucing’s” restaurant had established Angeles City as the “Sisig Capital of the Philippines” in 1974. Cunanan’s trademark sisig was developed in mid 1974 when she served a concoction of boiled and chopped pig ears and cheeks seasoned with vinegar, calamansi juice, chopped onions and chicken liver and served in hot plates. Today, varieties include sisig ala pizzailo, pork combination, green mussels or tahong, mixed seafood, ostrich sisig, spicy python, frog sisig and tokwa’t baboy, among others.

Ingredients:
Approx. 1/2 pig’s head, quartered
8 cups water
2 cups pineapple juice
1 tbsp whole black peppercorn
4 pcs chicken liver
1 tbsp iodized salt

Seasoning:
1 cup white onion, chopped
1/4 cup sukang puti
1/4 cup calamansi juice
salt and pepper to taste
siling labuyo, optional

Directions:
In a stockpot, place water, pineapple juice, salt, peppercorn, chicken liver and pig’s head. Cover stockpot and bring to a boil until meat becomes tender, approximately 30 minutes. Remove meat from stockpot and allow to cool to room temperature. Debone and put in bamboo skewers together with chicken liver. Grill over charcoal until skin becomes brown and crisp. Cut the pork and liver into small cubes. Mix the seasoning and serve on a hot skillet.

Pahabol: in the absence of pig’s head, substitute with 1 kilo bagnet or lechon kawali. It will be a knockout just the same.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisig

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