Tag Archives: Kadios

Kadios, Baboy, Lanka – KBL (Beans, pork, jackfruit)



The “Kadios” are black beans. If you’re not from Iloilo or the Visayas, you may not recognize this.  The “Langka” is jackfruit, raw and green, for the purpose of this recipe. Since there is no raw and green fresh jackfruit in my part of the world, I used the canned ones imported from Thailand (available at all oriental stores).
Which brings me to an important point – this recipe is intended for those in the U.S. or other parts of the world who don’t have access to a cook or ingredients.
Ingredients: (good for a family of 3 to 4, good for lunch, dinner and lunch the next day)
about 3/4 cup of Kadios. (Look for it in the frozen section. If you are in L.A., Florida, or Las Vegas, I heard they have fresh ones.)
beef shanks meat – about 2 to 3 pounds (sliced into desired sizes)
a can of young green, jackfruit (use fresh if you have, again, lucky you)
soy sauce, vinegar, salt to taste
3 cloves of garlic (crushed)
1 ginger (about a thumb-size, crushed as well)
1 medium-sized tomato (sliced into pieces)
1 medium-sized onion (sliced as well)
vegetable oil
(optional) lemon grass (tanglad)
(very optional) pechay (baby bokchoy)
– Soak the kadios in cold water overnight. This will rehydrate the beans. (they were dehydrated to preserve them to start with). Get rid of the floating ones.
– In a pressure cooker, together with the re-hydrated beans, add about 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. After 15 to 20 minutes of that dreaded pressure-cooker “hissing” sound, turn the fire off.
– In a separate pot or pan, put the garlic and ginger in about 3 tablespoons of hot oil. When they turn light brown, add the tomatoes and onions. Sweat the onions out a little, then add the meat (include the bones), about 3 tbsp (maybe more) of soy sauce, 3 tbsp (maybe more) of vinegar and salt to taste. You can adjust to your own taste later. Mix and cover for a good 5 minutes. The smell is very tempting at this point.
– Open that pressure-cooker with the kadios in it and add the just-sauteed meat. Add more water if necessary (kun gusto mo damu’ sabaw), put cover, turn the fire on and let it “hiss” for another 15 to 20 minutes. (If you’re using pork, remember that pork needs a shorter time to tenderize, you may want to shorten the time, or skip this step altogether.)
– After 15 to 20 minutes, turn off fire, and let hissing sound subside. You may transfer the pressure-cooker contents (the meat and beans now tenderized) if you wish to a regular pot. Bring to a boil again and add the “langka” (for about 5 minutes). Add the tanglad for its incredible aroma. Add more salt to taste.
– Add several pieces of pechay leaves if you want. To make it healthier (you wish). But you don’t have to.
– Get the rice, the soda and sleep afterwards…
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The “Kadios” are black beans. If you’re not from Iloilo or the Visayas, you may not recognize this.  The “Langka” is jackfruit, raw and green, for the purpose of this recipe. Since there is no raw and green fresh jackfruit in my part of the world, I used the canned ones imported from Thailand (available at all oriental stores).

Which brings me to an important point – this recipe is intended for those in the U.S. or other parts of the world who don’t have access to a cook or ingredients.

Ingredients: (good for a family of 3 to 4, good for lunch, dinner and lunch the next day)

about 3/4 cup of Kadios. (Look for it in the frozen section. If you are in L.A., Florida, or Las Vegas, I heard they have fresh ones.)

beef shanks meat – about 2 to 3 pounds (sliced into desired sizes)

a can of young green, jackfruit (use fresh if you have, again, lucky you)

soy sauce, vinegar, salt to taste

3 cloves of garlic (crushed)

1 ginger (about a thumb-size, crushed as well)

1 medium-sized tomato (sliced into pieces)

1 medium-sized onion (sliced as well)

vegetable oil

(optional) lemon grass (tanglad)

(very optional) pechay (baby bokchoy)

– Soak the kadios in cold water overnight. This will rehydrate the beans. (they were dehydrated to preserve them to start with). Get rid of the floating ones.

– In a pressure cooker, together with the re-hydrated beans, add about 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. After 15 to 20 minutes of that dreaded pressure-cooker “hissing” sound, turn the fire off.

– In a separate pot or pan, put the garlic and ginger in about 3 tablespoons of hot oil. When they turn light brown, add the tomatoes and onions. Sweat the onions out a little, then add the meat (include the bones), about 3 tbsp (maybe more) of soy sauce, 3 tbsp (maybe more) of vinegar and salt to taste. You can adjust to your own taste later. Mix and cover for a good 5 minutes. The smell is very tempting at this point.

– Open that pressure-cooker with the kadios in it and add the just-sauteed meat. Add more water if necessary (kun gusto mo damu’ sabaw), put cover, turn the fire on and let it “hiss” for another 15 to 20 minutes. (If you’re using pork, remember that pork needs a shorter time to tenderize, you may want to shorten the time, or skip this step altogether.)

– After 15 to 20 minutes, turn off fire, and let hissing sound subside. You may transfer the pressure-cooker contents (the meat and beans now tenderized) if you wish to a regular pot. Bring to a boil again and add the “langka” (for about 5 minutes). Add the tanglad for its incredible aroma. Add more salt to taste.

– Add several pieces of pechay leaves if you want. To make it healthier (you wish). But you don’t have to.

– Get the rice, the soda and sleep afterwards…

With your humble donation you can support our website to provide FREE recipes and our educational outreach activities to the community.


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